Programs recipients

Amy Gill 2012-2013 Bernice Goldblatt Scholar

PhD Student, Committee on Cancer Biology   ·   The University of Chicago

Amy GillHow has being a Goldblatt Scholar supported your career in cancer biology?

I am grateful for the support of the Goldblatt family during my graduate stuclies in cancer biology. As a Goldblatt Scholar, I am able to perform ground-breaking research in the laboratory of Richard B. Jones, PhD. My lab is one of few in the country that has the technology to measure many aspects of cell signaling simultaneously. Cell signaling, the process in which cells perceive and respond to their microenvironment, helps us better understand the behavior of cancer cells. Our lab is exploring ways to manipulate cancer cell signaling, which will make chemotherapy more effective.

What are your career goals?

After I lost one of my cousins to cancer, it's been my mission to advance awareness and research of cancer. I plan to pursue a career in cancer research and would like to someday manage my own laboratory. I will utilize my knowledge of cell signaling to design personalized cancer therapeutics that exploit the particular signal process problems that are unique to each patient's particular cancer.

Published Article:
Ostler KR, Yang Q, Looney Tj, Zhang L, Vasantllakumar A, Tian Y, Kocherginsky M, Rainloncli
SL, DeMaio jG, Salwen HR, Gu S, Chlenski A, Naranjo A, Gill A, Pedclinti R, Lahn BT, Cohn SL,
Godley LA. Truncated DNMT3B isoform DNMT3B7 suppresses growth, induces differentiation,
and alters DNA methylation in human neuroblastoma. Cancer Res. 2012 Sep 15:72(18):4714-23.